Business Process Data: On Dashboards and Windshields

Reading about IBM’s “Stream Computing” in Business Week magazine this week, I am reminded of a time in a meeting several years ago when I groaned: “I don’t want a better dashboard; I want a cleaner windshield. I want to know what’s coming and a dashboard can’t tell me that. Those are lagging indicators.  At best, a dashboard tells me what I have done in the recent past. I want to know what my suppliers and customers are doing as they approach…before they get here.”

On My Windshield

I never did get my Windshield. Today, we’re lucky if we have a dashboard. It would  put many of us in a small minority if we could have near-real-time indicators of what just happened  on our desk-tops. From a business process management perspective, how would life be if I could see changes in my supply chain before they affect me? If I could see my suppliers’ dashboards, would that be enough to give me an idea of what I could expect?  If, instead of relying on marketing, I relied on interoperable business data between my company and my customers, could I see their demand before they pick up the phone and place an order? That information would help me in innumerable ways.I suspect very large companies can afford supply-chain and distribution information management and reporting but what is a mid and small sized organization to do?

Is it possible that my contracts with suppliers and customers might involve strategic dashboard exchange? Of course  it is. In a business-to-business relationship, my clients might even think they were doing business with a pretty smart guy if they knew I needed to know something about their data prior to them needing to know they need me. I bet they would be happy to give me that information in small packets called “Bugs”. Throughout the day, “bugs” would hit my “windshield” and I would know what’s coming down the road. You could have a lot of fun with this metaphor. Landscape, traffic signs, intersections, accidents, traffic jams, you name it.

Operations, Finance, Marketing and Sales: Performance Metrics During the Race

Dashboards are helpful. Don’t get me wrong. I find them especially helpful once I have arrived. I can quickly look back over the course of the trip (or the day at work) and understand where I have been, what my top speed was, how many miles I covered and how much fuel I used (plug your favorite business metrics in here). A windshield, however, lets me calibrate  what is happening in the midst of a high-speed race. As a former football player, I can tell you that my stats after the game were a lot less important to me than was knowing where the line-backer was when I pulled out on a sweep. Failure to see my adversary or my teammates often caused me great pain. Successfully anticipating blows led to touchdowns.

The Importance of Anticipation: Getting Out of the Blind Spot

We are living through the negative consequences of not anticipating what lies ahead. We’ve all become so enamored with the rear-view mirror and the mounted DVD players in our SUVs that we have forgotten to simply out the window in front of us and drive defensively.

This may all seem trite and I may sound like I am beating this metaphor to death but I think we need simple reminders these days. Look outside your vehicle and assess what is happening down the road. Many companies have done this very well and managed to keep staffing levels and inventory at quite safe levels. Other companies were so busy fiddling with their dashboards and cell phones and doing their make-up while they drove that they missed their exit and went over a cliff.

What do you need to know about the road ahead and the drivers around you? What kinds of “bugs” do you want hitting your “windshield”? This is a great question for your next executive team meeting. It’s also a great question for your business analysts and your line staff.

  • what would you need to know about your customers’ “demand behavior” that would allow you to do your job better?
  • what would you need to know about your suppliers and supplies?
  • what would you need to know about the economy?
  • political changes around the state, country, world?
  • currency and credit changes?
  • social trends and patterns?
  • legal developments?

Keep in mind that as you’re driving in LA, for example, you don’t want to know what’s happening on the roads in Brussels. Keep your expectations “close” to you. There is little true and accurate value in looking “down the road” for more than 30-60 days at a time. Conditions on the roads are changing far too quickly. Pay attention to the drivers next to you where it matters most. The next bend in the road is far more important than the bridge several hundred miles away.

Give your data needs some attention, ask your suppliers and customers for data and use it effectively. Good data makes good information. Reliable information becomes intelligence and enough intelligence used appropriately over time makes one wise.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s