Building The Business Case For Process-Enhanced, Information-Rich Customer Service

We all need to revitalize our customer service, relationships with customers and motivate new levels of consumer confidence. That’s our job as business leaders and small business owners. Business is not a spectator sport. It is a high-speed art and science. Business Process Management offers a special opportunity to raise your customer’s experience to new heights. What I am about to suggest is not singularly going to turn things around for you but it is one thing you can do quickly. The more “mature” your organization is in its BPM development, the easier it ought to be to deploy. What I am talking about is not new. The credit probably goes to FedEx. It’s a standard in the minds of consumers and rightly so.

Take Me Through The Process

I am referring to the manner in which UPS and FedEx have incorporated tracking into every shipment. Information regarding my package can be as important to me as the package itself. Frankly, it’s common for me to feel more importantly about something arriving than is the something. For instance, the first time I used a web-based florist (flowers.com) to send my mother flowers, it was far more important that the flowers arrive on time. I was tickled to know the flowers got there and I never even saw the flowers! The same is true with my online banking. It has to perform flawlessly and reassure me that my mortgage got paid on time. I love my bank for the knowledge that my bill got paid. Every day, I get updates from my bank in my email. I am kept apprised constantly.

Information Is Service

As a customer, information concerning by business interactions is extremely important. By telling me when my dinner will be served in a restaurant, my server is allowing me to judge how long I can take discussing a proposal at the table with a client. When my Lexus dealership’s service center calls to tell me when a part will be in, I can better manage my travel schedule. When United Airlines sends email alerts that flight times have changed my kids’ flight 30 days in advance, I can rest assured that they will be safe and know where they’re supposed to be.

What’s In Your Process?

What information is embedded in your process that would add value to your customers’ lives? If a customer triggers an order, can you tell them where their order stands minutes, days and weeks later? If a decision has been made in process, how quickly and clearly do you notify them? If you must abide by certain rules in the disposition of their interaction with you, do you let them know what rule it is you are referring to? Refer to common BPM metrics (standardized in your industry) for more ideas or ask your competitors what they measure!

What Not To Do

My local hospital’s urgent outpatient unit (open for walk-in visits on weekends) treated me several months ago (May 2008). I paid the same co-pay I have for two years and went home with a prescription for an antibiotic. Very routine. HOWEVER, they failed to mention that they no longer contract with my insurer. My claim was denied by my insurer (naturally) so the hospital sent the unpaid portion of my bill to a collections agency. Said agency calls me and can’t tell me why my claim was denied. They didn’t have that information. I just owed them $113 or I could expect my credit score to take a big hit.

The story here is not the money and it is not the abysmal performance of our local hospital. The story is in the lost opportunity to manage information and contain a customer experience. I regularly refer everyone I know to their competitor.

Customer Service: Seize The Data

Look deep inside, walk through your own processes and find the valuable data. Talk to your customers (really talk to them!) and ask them what they’d like to know and why. This is basic but so few businesses actually take the time to do it. Information is relatively inexpensive so stop being so stingy! If you want my confidence, you will earn it with useful, accurate and timely information. And – by the way – I will tell you what is useful, meaningful, valuable information. I am, after all, the customer.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s