Business Process Management (BPM) Core to Business Models Capable of Succeeding in this Economy

Reading the newspaper or watching TV news lately is an exercise in developing a blistering case of depression or anxiety or both. At the close of business this week we learned about record numbers of unemployment claims as well as lay-offs at Kodak, Ford, Starbucks, Caterpillar and Home Depot. Nearly twice as many people are unemployed today as were 12 months ago. The Dow dropped more than 8% this week and new home sales dropped almost 15% in December to their lowest point ever. How can anyone envision improved business prospects in this climate?

There’s Hope!

You can find examples of success if you look in the right places, folks. While the International Air Transport Association was reporting record losses for airlines this past year, they (in a January 30 USA Today story) acknowledged that “the only major carrier to report a profit in 2008 was Dallas-based discount giant Southwest Airlines.” Another story this week confirmed that while retailers continue to count the change in their pockets (and Circuit City says good-bye), this side-bar managed a small mention: “Citing its best holiday season ever, Amazon.com reported 4th quarter profits of $225M. The retailer said revenue rose 18% to $6.7 billion exceeding analysts estimates.”

This is Still an Economy After All

Those of us who remain in business must remember that we are in business. This is not family and it is not a social event. Nothing is certain in business and it is rich with risk and speculation. We are involved in developing and continuously massaging business models and business plans. If ever there was a bell weather event demanding BPM, this recession is it.  I have heard people tell me (this week!) that they do not want to “lose the art” involved in how they conduct themselves and execute their core processes. They “prefer the judgment and reflection involved in making choices as to how to proceed” and want to “preserve that unique and individualized process”…while they go out of business!

BPM is not and should not be about hard-coding anything. Rather, it enables you to design work and process that can more easily be tweaked and simulated to suit conditions assuming you stay on top of both the conditions and the process. This is active, dynamic and organic stuff.

Several people have commented that Southwest, Amazon, Wal-Mart and Costco are thriving right now because they have a different business model than their competitors. I want to suggest that that is the point. It is past time for all of us to question our business model and challenge (aggressively) our enshrined assumptions concerning the way we do business.  Each of these companies challenged their entire industry and introduced unparalleled and disruptive innovation.

When, in healthcare for instance, professionals wonder why their patients seek health education online at WebMD rather than making an appointment, someone is evidently not paying attention.  1,000,000 medical tourists will take their hard-earned money to Thailand, India and Mexico for that hip replacement. Wal-Mart sells prescriptions for $4 and Minute Clinics are popping up in malls and grocery stores by the hundreds. Times have changed so it’s best to invest in change.

Innovate or Die?

Most of us can find plenty of evidence for what it is our customers and prospects don’t want to buy. How many of us are working as hard as we can to discover what it is they do want to buy? How many of us are innovating our business processes so that we can drive a new business model in a new business and economic environment? Using BPM to bring a visual/graphic dimension to what you do and how you do it will allow you to unlock the “Special Sauce” potential in your business. Until you can look into the core of your business machinations, you lack the perspective to see how it is that you can discover quality and efficiency gains while incorporating the voice of your customer in the process.

Some people argue with the “Innovate or Die” adage. Ok. Try this: Adapt to rapidly changing conditions by changing your business model (customer value proposition, resource mix, processes, financial formula). Choose your market carefully and sell what your customers want to buy at a price they can afford.

Remember: there are still many trillions of dollars in the economy! What can you do to tap into that? How can BPM support your mission?

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